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U.S.-China Trade War Is Bad News for Google's ExpansionU.S.-China Trade War Is Bad News for Google's Expansion

The barring of Chinese smartphone maker ZTE by the U.S. government from working with American companies is an unforeseen challenge for Google in a bid to get its mobile software in the hands of wider swaths of users.

Airline Regulators Call for Emergency Inspections of Boeing 737 EnginesAirline Regulators Call for Emergency Inspections of Boeing 737 Engines

U.S. aviation regulators in the wake of this week’s fatal Southwest Airlines accident imposed emergency inspection requirements for jet engines that power many Boeing 737 jetliners around the world.

Starbucks Lacks Clear Guidance for Employees on Nonpaying CustomersStarbucks Lacks Clear Guidance for Employees on Nonpaying Customers

Recent arrests of two nonpaying visitors at a Philadelphia Starbucks have raised questions among some employees about how to handle such situations.

Amazon Trades Like a Tech Stock But Pays Like a WarehouseAmazon Trades Like a Tech Stock But Pays Like a Warehouse

Median pay at Amazon reveals the predominantly blue-collar nature of its workforce, which sets it apart from tech peers Facebook, Apple and Google-parent Alphabet Inc.

Who Has More of Your Personal Data Than Facebook? Try GoogleWho Has More of Your Personal Data Than Facebook? Try Google

Google’s data-gathering empire is bigger and more pervasive than Facebook’s—and while it hasn’t been plagued by scandal, it can’t evade scrutiny forever.

White House Backs Funding Increase for World BankWhite House Backs Funding Increase for World Bank

The Trump administration is setting aside its skepticism of big international institutions that manage the global economy, in part because it wants to use the World Bank as a counterweight to China’s growing international influence.

OPEC, Russia Back Continued Oil Cuts, Drawing Trump IreOPEC, Russia Back Continued Oil Cuts, Drawing Trump Ire

A group of some of the world’s biggest crude producers said they would keep a tight grip on output for the rest of the year, and perhaps into next, spurring President Donald Trump to call oil prices “artificially very high.”